Thursday, August 21, 2014

This Book Room

Christina Kempf has always known that God chose Aden Reese to be her husband. As children, he was there to save her when she fell through the ice, and he’s been by her side ever since. After his parents died in a car accident ten years ago, the Kempfs raised Aden as one of their own, and everyone sees Aden and Christina as brother and sister. But Christina has never given up hope that Aden will one day ask her to be his wife.

Aden always planned to court Christina. But losing his mother and father changed everything—except his love for her. Her parents generously welcomed him into their home and treated him like a son. He can’t betray their kindness by admitting his feelings for the girl who is like a sister . . . yet so much more.

Pressured by her parents to court, Christina begins to accept the attentions of Sugarcreek’s young men, and now, Aden must make a choice. Will he stand by and watch the love of his life slip away? Or will he risk losing the love and trust of the family he holds dear to tell Christina how he truly feels?

Additional notes: This is the second book in the Return to Sugarcreek series. You can read my review of the first book here. The third book in this series will be out later this year.

My thoughts: This was very much a trite boy/girl love story, but I enjoyed the depth of the story. Christina was very fearful and really let it get in her way of living. It was a good reminder to me to let the past go and live in the now. We can't let past fears stop us from living the life we desire to.

At a car boot sale in Sussex, three very different women meet and fall for the same vintage teaset. They decide to share it - and form a friendship that changes their lives.

Jenny can't wait to marry Dan. Then, after years of silence, she hears from the woman who could shatter her dreams.

Maggie has put her broken heart behind her and is gearing up for the biggest event of her career - until she's forced to confront the past once more.

Alison seems to have it all: married to her childhood sweetheart, with two gorgeous daughters. But as tensions mount, she is pushed to breaking point.

Dealing with friendship and families, relationships and careers, highs and lows, The Vintage Teacup Club is heart-warming storytelling at its very best.


My thoughts: This was such a fun read! I really wanted to just sit and devour this book. It reminded me a lot of Kate Jacobs' knitting series and books like that. I sincerely hope the author writes more books similar to the Teacup Club.

Marcy can’t wait to see the new exhibit at the Tallulah Falls museum on antique tapestries and textiles, including beautiful kilim rugs. But her enthusiasm quickly turns to terror when, the day after the exhibition opens, she discovers a dead body behind her store, the Seven-Year Stitch, wrapped up in a most unusual fashion.

The victim appears to be a visiting art professor in town for the exhibit. Did someone decide to teach the professor a lesson, then attempt to sweep the evidence under the rug? Along with her boyfriend, Detective Ted Nash, Marcy must unravel an intricate tapestry of deception to find a desperate killer.
Additional notes: This is the seventh book in the Embroidery Mystery series. As far as I know, this series is ongoing. You can read my review of the first book here, the second book here, the third book here, the fourth book here, the fifth book here and the sixth book here.

My thoughts: Generally speaking, it is hard to imagine one tiny town could have so many deaths and mystery. But maybe that is the point - to be so far outside what is real so you can really just delve in and enjoy this whodunit. If nothing else, this series always inspires me to craft a little bit more and I can always use motivation in that arena.

Life hasn't been a bed of roses for Londoner Molly Taylor lately. Newly divorced and struggling to
find a new home and a way to support her three boys, she's stunned when her beloved Aunt Helena dies and leaves her Harrington Hall, a three-hundred-year-old manor house on the Devon coast, where Molly grew up. But does Molly really want to run a bed-and-breakfast in an old house where the only thing that doesn't need urgent attention is Aunt Helena's beautiful rose garden? Or care for Uncle Bertie, an eccentric former navy officer with a cliff-top cannon? Or Betty, his rude parrot that bites whomever annoys it? Yet Molly's best friend Lola is all for the plan. "My heart bleeds. Your very own beach, the beautiful house, and Helena's garden. All you have to do is grill a bit of bacon."

But with Molly's conniving brother running the family hotel nearby, the return of a high school flame with ulterior motives, and three sons whose idea of a new country life seems to involve vast quantities of mud, this is not going to be easy. And then Harrington Hall begins to work its magic, and the roses start to bloom...

Warm, witty, and chock-full of quintessential British charm, A GOOD YEAR FOR THE ROSES is a story for anyone who has ever dreamed of starting over...with or without bacon.

My thoughts: I thoroughly enjoyed this book, particularly Molly's children. They were absolutely delightful and hilarious. They made the book for me. The characters reminded me a lot of the characters in Gil's other novels, which was somewhat confusing at first. Overall, I'm a fan of this book and can't wait for her next one!

Ramona the Pest takes a pint-sized perspective on the trials and delights of beginning school. Ramona can't wait to learn all the important things. But she's disappointed when her teacher can't fill in missing parts of story lines, such as how Mike Mulligan (of Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel) went to the bathroom while digging the basement of the town hall. Nonetheless, Ramona loves her teacher, and loves going to school in spite of the torments--having to wear hand-me-down boots, for example, or having to (sometimes) suppress the urge to pull on another girl's "boing-boing" curls. Ramona's energetic take on life appeals to children who have passed through this stage, or who are dealing with a kindergarten-age sibling who is exhibiting Ramona-ish tendencies.

Additional notes: This is the second book in the Ramona Quimby series. You can read my review of the first book here. There are eight books in this series and all have been released.

My thoughts: Oh, Ramona. You are far too silly for your own good. I loved her view on her kindergarten teacher. Ramona and her family crack me up, and I'm so excited to keep reading about them!

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