Saturday, June 2, 2012

This Book Room

As spring turns into summer, Elizabeth relishes her new role as a young wife, while her sister, Diana, searches for adventure abroad. But when a surprising clue about their father's death comes to light, the Holland girls wonder at what cost a life of splendor comes. In the dramatic conclusion to the New York Times bestselling Luxe series, Manhattan's most dazzling socialites chase dreams, cling to promises, and tempt fate. Only one question remains: Will they fade away or will they shine ever brighter?

Additional notes: This is the fourth and final book in the Luxe series. You can read my review of the first book here, my review of the second book here and my review of the third book here.

My thoughts: What a terrific end to this series. I was so happy with the way Anna wrapped up this series. I particularly enjoyed Elizabeth's story. I wasn't very surprised by Diana and Henry's ending. Don't know what I'm talking about? Read this series - it's quick, fun and perfect for summer!

Featuring advice, wisdom, and observations from an array of prominent and beloved women, 30 Things is an essential guide (and perfect gift) for women on the brink of thirty—and for those who are already there! Fifteen years ago, Glamour published a list of distinctive yet universally true must-haves and must-knows for women on the cusp of and beyond the age of thirty titled, “30 Things Every Woman Should Have and Should Know by the Time She’s 30.” It became a phenomenon. Originally penned by Glamour columnist Pamela Redmond Satran, The List found a second life when women began to forward it to one another online, millions of times. It became a viral sensation, misattributed to everyone from Maya Angelou to Hillary Clinton—but there’s only one original list, and it stands the test of time. Quirky and profound, The List defines the absolute must-haves (#11: “A set of screwdrivers, a cordless drill, and a black lace bra”) and must-knows (#1: “How to fall in love without losing yourself”) for grown-up female happiness. Now, Glamour magazine has gathered together its editors and an incredible group of notable women to expand on each of the items on The List in wise, thoughtful, and intimate essays. Kathy Griffin meditates on knowing when to try harder and when to walk away. Lisa Ling explores the idea that your childhood may not have been perfect, but it’s over, and Lauren Conrad shares what she has learned about what she would and wouldn’t do for money or love. Other personal insights come from Maya Angelou, Rachel Zoe, Taylor Swift, Katie Couric, Portia de Rossi, Kelly Corrigan, ZZ Packer, Bobbi Brown, Padma Lakshmi, Angie Harmon, and many more. Along with essays based on The List, writers share their feelings about what the milestone of turning thirty meant to them. 30 Things is the one book women of all ages will turn to for timely and timeless wisdom.

My thoughts: This was a delightful read. I didn't agree with everything the essays promoted, but they were fun to read. There were so many wonderful and interesting people who penned the essays, too - Suze Orman, Lauren Conrad {in addition to the authors specifically listed in the summary above}. I highly recommend this book to women of any age.

Welcome to Trenton, New Jersey, home to wiseguys, average Joes, and Stephanie Plum, who sports a big attitude and even bigger money problems (since losing her job as a lingerie buyer for a department store). Stephanie needs cash--fast--but times are tough, and soon she's forced to turn to the last resort of the truly desperate: family.

Stephanie lands a gig at her sleazy cousin Vinnie's bail bonding company. She's got no experience. But that doesn't matter. Neither does the fact that the bail jumper in question is local vice cop Joe Morelli. From the time he first looked up her dress to the time he first got into her pants to the time Steph hit him with her father's Buick, M-o-r-e-l-l-i has spelled t-r-o-u-b-l-e. And now the hot guy is in hot water--wanted for murder.

Abject poverty is a great motivator for learning new skills, but being trained in the school of hard knocks by people like psycho prizefighter Benito Ramirez isn't. Still, if Stephanie can nab Morelli in a week, she'll make a cool ten grand. All she has to do is become an expert bounty hunter overnight--and keep herself from getting killed before she gets her man.


Additional notes: This is the first book in the Stephanie Plum series. There are 18 books in this series {along with some between-the-numbers books}, and so far as I know, this series is ongoing.

My thoughts: Jason and I rented One for the Money from a Redbox kiosk and thoroughly enjoyed it. I knew it was a book, so I thought if I liked the movie that much, surely, I would enjoy this series. The book is, of course, far better than the movie. I'm excited to have found a new series to read! Jason's also reading this series and enjoying it.

Although she's taken an interest in Irish embroidery, Marcy Singer can't help but abandon her needlecraft when handsome local brewer Todd finds himself accused of murder. Both Todd and his friend Blake's fingerprints are on the murder weapon, and neither is talking about what happened. Marcy is determined to stitch together some luck from more than a few four-leaf clovers and prove that the culprit was someone else...

Additional notes: This is the fourth book in the Embroidery Mystery series. You can read my review of the first book here, the second book here and the third book here. So far as I know, this series is ongoing.

My thoughts: I really enjoy this series. But I really don't like Todd. There are two love interests in Marcy's life, and I really hope, at the end of the day or this series, she ends up with Ted. And no, I don't really know why I care so much. I just do. Haha.

Boys don’t keep diaries—or do they?

The launch of an exciting and innovatively illustrated new series narrated by an unforgettable kid every family can relate to

It’s a new school year, and Greg Heffley finds himself thrust into middle school, where undersized weaklings share the hallways with kids who are taller, meaner, and already shaving. The hazards of growing up before you’re ready are uniquely revealed through words and drawings as Greg records them in his diary.

In book one of this debut series, Greg is happy to have Rowley, his sidekick, along for the ride. But when Rowley’s star starts to rise, Greg tries to use his best friend’s newfound popularity to his own advantage, kicking off a chain of events that will test their friendship in hilarious fashion.

Author/illustrator Jeff Kinney recalls the growing pains of school life and introduces a new kind of hero who epitomizes the challenges of being a kid. As Greg says in his diary, "Just don’t expect me to be all 'Dear Diary’ this and 'Dear Diary’ that.” Luckily for us, what Greg Heffley says he won’t do and what he actually does are two very different things.

Additional notes: This is the first book in the Diary of a Wimpy Kid series. There are currently six books in this series. This series is ongoing.

My thoughts: I had read reviews online for this book, and they were horrible! But after a random person {aka a manager at a local fast food restaurant} recommended this series to me, I decided to check out this series. I thought this book was spot on in terms of behavior and attitude of middle-grade level children. This book was really fun to read, and the comics were entertaining. I've already requested the second book in this series from our library!

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